Walking Our Watershed

On August 10 Ben Cote of Friends of the Ten Mile led a walk along a portion of the Ten Mile River in Attleboro, beginning at Larson Woodland.  Ben explained the pivotal role the river played in the Industrial Revolution two centuries ago, when factories were built alongside the river and dams were created with water wheels providing a source of mechanical power.  In the 20th century, the river also became a convenient place to dump industrial waste, until environmental awareness eventually took hold.  Today it is illegal to dump waste into the river, but stormwater running off lawns carries fertilizers into the river, leading to algae blooms which rob fish of oxygen.

As the group moved up the watershed towards the Water Street bridge, it was joined by longtime watershed advocate Don Doucette, who shared some of his knowledge of the river and its history.

Watershed advocate Don Doucette points out the confluence of the Bungay and Ten Mile Rivers from the Water Street bridge.    Image credit: C. Adler

A Summer Day at the Anthony Lawrence Wildlife Preserve

The photos in this post were all taken on July 8, 2019.  Some photos were taken along the trails, others, such as the photo of the deer, were taken in the marsh.  The marsh is a vast expanse of marsh grass and cattails.  The Seven Mile River and Tannery Brook enter the marsh separately, then join together.  It is possible to walk in the marsh when the water level is low, as it was on this day.  However, one must be sure-footed as the terrain is very lumpy and your foot may suddenly sink in a wet spot, especially as you near the river.

Marsh at Anthony Lawrence Wildlife Preserve    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Seven Mile River at Lawrence Preserve    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Cattails    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Mulberry tree    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Black raspberries    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Wild grapes    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Wild strawberries    Image credit: C. Adler

The Photographic Legacy of Martha Nickerson

Martha L. Nickerson was not only the donor of the 48 acres of land that is now the Nickerson Walking Woods Preserve.  Her life was filled with accomplishments.  She held a doctorate in education and served as a school librarian and teacher, not only in Attleboro, but at U.S. military installations around the globe.  On her travels she excelled at photography, capturing what she saw in color slides.  Those images are now in the care of artist Kalliope Amorphous, who has been posting them on Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/marthanickersonarchive/

 

Seasonal Changes Bring Colorful Displays to the Richardson Preserve

Each week brings changes to the Richardson Preserve, some from native plants that are flowering, others from plants cultivated by Deborah Richardson when she lived and practiced her horticultural skills here.

 

The Glen at the Deborah and Roger Richardson Nature Preserve, April 25, 2019    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Pink Azalea bordering The Glen at the Richardson Preserve    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Skeletal tracery is all that remains from a clump of grass that ornamented Deborah’s Garden last fall.    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Ornamental grass in foreground at Deborah’s Garden, with Umbrella Pine (Sciadopitys verticillata) in the background    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Daffodils at the Richardson Preserve    Image credit: C. Adler

Landscaping with Native Plants

Grow Native Massachusetts, based in Waltham, is a great resource for anyone interested in gardening and landscaping with native plants.  They hold an evening lecture series every year from February to May at the Cambridge Public Library.  Videos of past lectures are available online.  They also have a plant sale coming up in Waltham on June 1, 2019.

Annual Survey Monitors the Health of the Ten Mile River and Its Inhabitants

On September 22, volunteers from the Ten Mile River Watershed Council assisted ranger Jacob Gorke of the Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council of Rhode Island in conducting a survey of fish species in the Ten Mile River at Larson Woodland.

The fish are stunned temporarily with an electric shock, netted and removed to be identified, then released back to the river.  The survey is conducted annually.

Fish survey volunteers receiving their instructions.    Image credit: Keith Gonsalves

This is just one of many activities conducted year round by the Ten Mile River Watershed Council to promote and protect the river.  For more information, contact Keith Gonsalves Keith@tenmileriver.net.