Seasonal Changes Bring Colorful Displays to the Richardson Preserve

Each week brings changes to the Richardson Preserve, some from native plants that are flowering, others from plants cultivated by Deborah Richardson when she lived and practiced her horticultural skills here.

 

The Glen at the Deborah and Roger Richardson Nature Preserve, April 25, 2019    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Pink Azalea bordering The Glen at the Richardson Preserve    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Skeletal tracery is all that remains from a clump of grass that ornamented Deborah’s Garden last fall.    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Ornamental grass in foreground at Deborah’s Garden, with Umbrella Pine (Sciadopitys verticillata) in the background    Image credit: C. Adler

 

Daffodils at the Richardson Preserve    Image credit: C. Adler

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Barrows House Offers View Into Attleboro History

Bill Lewis got involved with the Deborah and Roger Richardson Preserve through serving as a site steward along with other members of the Attleboro Geocachers Alliance.  After helping to repair the exterior of the Barrows House, his passion for history led him to dig deep into historical records for the property and the family that lived there for more than two centuries.  Drawing on these records, as well as a general knowledge of how colonists were able to survive and prosper using the technology of the times, Bill has developed a detailed history of the Barrows House and farm.

He shared this story at a meeting of the Attleboro Historic Preservation Society on March 21.  For a short interview with Bill, check out this YouTube clip by our local cable company, DoubleACS:

Barrows House Video

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Current Volunteer Requests

  1. Help us fill wet spots in the existing trails at the Nickerson Preserve
  2. Volunteers needed to mark our boundaries and post trail signs
  3. Helpers with graphics and editing skills needed for publicity
  4. Bookkeeper/accounting

We are an ALL-Volunteer operation.  Please contact Roy Belcher (serenade_w4@yahoo.com) if interested in learning more about volunteering.

 

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Don’t Miss Our Annual Meeting on October 23

Our annual meetings are typically a time for socializing with other nature lovers, learning something new from a guest speaker, and celebrating the year’s accomplishments, and this year is no exception.

The Attleboro Land Trust is working to preserve properties containing both wetland and upland habitats, a strategy that benefits many wildlife species, especially amphibians.  Our guest at the Annual Meeting will be Carol Entin, who will speak about the variety of common and uncommon amphibian species that inhabit our region.

Attleboro hosts approximately 20% of all known pure blue-spotted salamanders in the northeastern United States! The marbled salamander is also an Attleboro resident. Neighboring Rehoboth hosts 2 of only 8 known inland populations of the Eastern spadefoot toad. Carol, a volunteer amphibian monitor for the Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, will give a photo presentation about N.E. Amphibians, then focus on how monitors do their work and how you can contribute sightings to the Massachusetts database. A retired Moses Brown science teacher (32 years), and former Caratunk Wildlife Refuge assistant director, Carol is a passionate advocate for amphibians!

Eastern spadefoot toad    Image credit: Carol Entin

Attleboro Land Trust Annual Meeting
Open to the Public
Tuesday, October 23, 2018 6:00PM
Attleboro Arts Museum
86 Park Street, Attleboro, MA

Light Refreshments
Bring Your ID for Wine

ANNUAL MEETING AGENDA
October 23, 2018

6:00 – 6:30 Social half-hour with wine, cheese and fruit
6:30 – 6:40 Welcome and State of the ALT – Roy Belcher, President
6:40 – 6:45 Election of Directors (per handout with slate of nominations)
By Mike O’Brien
6:45 – 7:00 Recognition of volunteers and helpers
7:00 – 7:45 Guest Speaker, Carol Entin, Amphibians in our backyard

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Fairy Houses Bring Imagination and Creativity to the Richardson Preserve on October 14

Create a fairy house on your own and bring it to the Deborah and Roger Richardson Nature Preserve Preserve for set up and display at 9:00 am on Sunday, October 14.  Or come later that day to enjoy the exhibit from 10:00 am through 12:00 noon. Either way you will have a chance to make and take a fairy garden at this event.

What are Fairy Houses? According to the Fairy House official website: “Fairy Houses are small structures for the fairies and woodland creatures. Ranging from simple to intricate ‘Fairy Mansions’, these whimsical habitats are built by children, families, gardeners and nature lovers reflecting their creativity, joy and pride.” Google “fairy houses” for images, ideas and instructions.

Fairy houses will be exhibited at the creator’s own risk and be removed at the end of the 1-day, 2-hour exhibit, or left in the woods for the fairies and removed when needed by the land trust.

To register, go to the event listing page. Click on the register link or call: 508-222-0157.

This fairy house by Sarah Mott will be one of the creations on display at the Richardson Preserve on October 14.

Attleboro Land Trust sponsored Big Read Event
9:00 am – 12:00 noon
Fairy House Exhibit
In the Glen and Deborah’s Garden
At Deborah and Roger Richardson Nature Preserve
577B Wilmarth Street, Attleboro

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Next Generation

“We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” –attributed to Chief Seattle

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail