15th Annual River Clean-Up to be held September 25th.

Please join us in supporting the Ten Mile River cleanup on September 25th. (8am -11am)

(Information below from the Sun Chronicle Article)

Members of the general public, conservation commissioners, Attleboro Land Trust members and other local groups will work alongside elected officials including Mayor Paul Heroux and members of the council.

Volunteers can sign up on the day of the event at a tent in the Community Gardens on Riverbank Road.

The GPS address is 37 Hayward St., Attleboro.

Some supplies will be available, although anyone wanting to be a “River Rat” should bring their own waders or wetsuit.

Families and children are welcome to collect trash along the river walkways.

Free refreshments will be supplied by Dunkin’.

Sponsors are Heroux, the land trust, conservation commission, Dunkin’ and Friends of the Ten Mile River.

For more information contact Nick Wyllie at 508-223-2222, ext. 3145.

New TerraCorps Member for the Attleboro Land Trust – Evan Foster

Riding my bike in the Adirondacks.

My name is Evan Foster, and I will be serving as the TerraCorps member at the Attleboro Land Trust for the next several months. TerraCorps members are a part of the larger AmeriCorps National program whose mission states “making service an indispensable part of the American experience”. TerraCorps service members are placed in community-nonprofits across the states of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The TerraCorps mission is to engage and mobilize future leaders to get involved with local communities and conserve land for both people and nature. Equity is at the heart of what TerraCorps strives to achieve. TerraCorps members understand that individuals in underrepresented communities do not have the same access to these public lands and aim to create opportunities for those communities to experience them. The future of land conservation lies in the same goal of making land more equitable. To understand more about the TerraCorps mission, I highly recommend visit their website to read more: (https://terracorps.org/equity-in-land-conservation/).

Skiing at Jay Peak Resort in Vermont.

Growing up in Boxborough, MA in a family that highly valued outdoor recreation, my passion for environmental work was formed at a young age. My childhood experiences ranged from skating on a backyard rink to attending a canoe summer camp in Canada to swimming in the local pond to running cross country in high school. I developed a love for the outdoors, and it has shaped everything that I have done so far. When it was time for me to think about attending college, I landed on the University of Vermont because of its strong environmental program. Living in Burlington, Vermont gave me access to an endless number of outdoor activities including cross country and downhill skiing, snowshoeing, road/mountain biking, rock climbing, and numerous hikes throughout the Green Mountains. My degree in Environmental Science was complimented and enhanced by all of these activities. I soon discovered another passion of mine through my Geospatial Technologies minor which involved using satellite imagery for a variety of reasons including creating maps, analyzing spatial data, and much more. I continued with this passion into my undergraduate job at the Spatial Analysis Lab where I gained experience creating Land Use/Land Cover maps for cities and towns across North America. I developed an indispensable skill that I hope to bring to the Attleboro Land Trust. I am extremely excited to be serving with the Attleboro Land Trust and am ready to put my education and knowledge to use! Feel free to reach out to me if you have questions or want to get to know me better (evanfosteralt@gmail.com). Happy winter!

31st Annual Meeting on November 17

Save the date–the public is invited

November 17th 7:00 pm via Zoom

This year’s guests promise an expert’s look at the past 30 years of land conservation, contrasted with an exploration of what the future holds for the local environment.

Our guests are uniquely qualified to guide us on this quest.  They are:

  • Charlie Wyman, former land preservation specialist with the Massachusetts Audubon Society,
  • the Honorable Mayor of the City of Attleboro, Paul Heroux, and
  • moderating their online discussion about our environmental future will be renowned educator and talk show host, Ron Struminski.

We’ll also be recognizing some of our dedicated volunteers who have kept the Land Trust moving forward in spite of the pandemic and letting our members in on some hot news about upcoming activities and projects.

Please plan to zoom in.  The Zoom invitation is posted below:

###############################

Topic: ALT 31st Annual Meeting
Time: Nov 17, 2020 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89029943713?pwd=QTJMeGVUODdaVy95LzB2bTc1cXZOQT09

Meeting ID: 890 2994 3713
Passcode: 719575
One tap mobile

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Meeting ID: 890 2994 3713
Passcode: 719575
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kLS8o5kzI

Construction underway at the Richardson Preserve

Construction of a gravel parking lot near the street at the Richardson Nature Preserve has been in the planning stages for several years, and has now begun. Cryan Landscape Contractors are doing the work.  The plans have been approved by the Attleboro Conservation Commission and the lot will be similar to gravel lots at the Colman Reservation and the Nickerson Preserve.  This will solve the issue of cars getting stuck in the mud, as typically happens in early spring.

The main entrance to the preserve may be closed during construction.  Pedestrian access will still be available on Wilmarth Street about 200 yards east of the main entrance where the Vernal Pool trail enters the preserve.

We estimate the work will be completed by October 17.

Stop & Shop community bag program participation resumes in November

The Attleboro land trust would like to thank Stop and Shop and all those who purchased a reusable bag in September.  To date the program has donated $178 to the Land Trust.

We are please to announce that we have been chosen again as a participant to the program in the month of November.

Purchase a reusable Community Bag from the Stop & Shop located at 251 Washington Street, Attleboro, and a portion of that purchase will support the land trust.

The Attleboro Land Trust has been selected as a beneficiary of the Stop & Shop Community Bag Program for the month of November. The Land Trust will receive a $1 donation every time the $2.50 reusable Community Bag is purchased at this location during November.

The Stop & Shop Community Bag Program, which launched in May 2019, is a reusable bag program that facilitates community support with the goal to make a difference in the communities where shoppers live and work.  The Attleboro Land Trust was selected as the September beneficiary of the program by store leadership at the Stop & Shop located at 251 Washington Street, Attleboro MA.

For more information on the Stop & Shop Community Bag Program, visit stopandshop.bags4mycause.com

 

Thanks to our volunteers

On Tuesday, May 26, a work party of nine volunteers helped with the maintenance of Nickerson Walking Woods Preserve.  The work was peformed with coronavirus precautions and the size of the group was limited to a maximum of ten people.


Most of the work focused on the meadow, which had become overgrown with invasive buckthorn saplings.

 


The invasive plants were removed by the roots to prevent them from growing back.

 


One of our volunteers helped to extend the life of a boardwalk by removing leaves and dirt that had collected between the slats.

If you would like to help with future work parties, contact us.

COVID-19 Guidelines

Attleboro Land Trust properties are open during daylight hours, with the understanding that visitors will follow local, state, and federal COVID-19 rules and guidelines.

When visiting our properties:

  • Maintain a 6-foot distance between yourself and other people on trails, boardwalks, and at parking lots.
  • Be generous in yielding the right of way to others, if you can safely do so.
  • On loop trails, follow the arrows.
  • Do not step onto a boardwalk if someone is already on the boardwalk coming toward you.
  • Treat all with extra courtesy and respect.
  • Leash your dog, use a doggie bag, and take it home with you.
  • Remember to take precautions for ticks.

For extra comfort on the trail, download and print a trail map before you leave home.

Attleboro Land Trust – Coronavirus Contingency Plans

If you were planning to attend or volunteer at one of our events, we understand that your plans might change, based on concerns about the coronavirus. By the same token, we may cancel some of our planned events and activities, out of an abundance of caution, or use various communication tools, rather than face-to-face meetings, to carry out our work. Any cancellations or updates to our scheduled activities will be announced on our website.

News About Your Land Trust and More

Click below to read our monthly electronic newsletter, intended for distribution over social media, that includes news of what is happening at our conservation properties, as well as general conservation topics. There are also articles on Attleboro history, with a focus on the Barrows Farm (now the Richardson Preserve) and what seasonal tasks the Barrows family might have been working on as they derived their living from this land 300 years ago. News of the Attleboro Community Garden is also a regular feature.
This publication is being produced by the Education and Outreach Committee of the Attleboro Land Trust, local volunteers, and some of the classes at Attleboro High School.

Newsletters

Contact us if you would like to subscribe to the email version of this newsletter.