Thanks to Our Donors, 2019-20

We are grateful to the following organizations and individuals for their financial support of our mission through donations and in-kind contributions.

Corporate Sponsors and Institutional Partners, 2019-20

American Legion Aux Unit # 312
Attleboro Arts Museum
Attleboro Foundation/Bank of America, N.A.
Briggs Garden and Home
Casey Law Offices, P.C.
Cryan Landscape Contractors, Inc.
Duffy-Poule Funeral Service Inc
Faulkner Family Foundation
Fredric J Hammerle Charitable Trust
Gilmore Insurance
Houghton Physical Therapy
Lewis & Sullivan, P.C.
Liston Portables
Plymouth Rock Foundation
Reeves Company
Sensata Technologies, Inc.
W. Walsh Company, Inc.
Woodard & Curran Foundation
Zumalt Tree Experts

Individual Major Donors, 2019-2020

Sponsors

Ted and Debby Leach

Caretakers

Don and Laura Ouellette

Trail Blazers

Lucia and Bruce Field
Richard Harris
Brian Hatch and Kelly Neil
Rev. David Hill
Tim and Gloria McGinn
Michael and Patricia Murphy

Protectors of Flora and Fauna

Denise Antaya & Clif Ennis
Roy Belcher and Bertha Young
Victor and Karen Bonneville
Laurel Carlson
Anne and Mike Newquist
Gretchen Reilly

A Grant with Fond Memories Attached

Applying for a grant is usually a laborious process, requiring pages of applications, documents, and financial statements.  Usually!  The Attleboro Land Trust recently received a $2000 grant that came to us through a different set of circumstances.

Enter Sherri Peak-Palermo, who works for Woodard & Curran, an environmental consulting firm with an office in Providence. The firm, together with its employees, has set up a foundation to support non-profit groups across the country in their efforts to protect the environment.

Sherri is the daughter-in-law of the late Paul Palermo, Sr., who passed away in 2019.  Palermo was widely-respected as the City of Attleboro’s electrical inspector, serving in that capacity for 30 years.  Sherri nominated the Attleboro Land Trust for the grant in memory of her father-in-law and in recognition of his love for the city.

Our thanks to the Woodard & Curran Foundation for this grant, and to Sherri for nominating us.  Stay tuned for more about the specific project on which these funds will be spent.

Attleboro Land Trust properties remain open

As of March 24, 2020

Attleboro Land Trust properties remain open (during daylight hours) for the time being.

Please comply with local, state, and federal emergency orders.

Please follow guidelines recommended by government health agencies.

When visiting our properties:

  • Maintain a 6-foot distance between yourself and other people on trails, boardwalks, and at parking lots.
  • Be generous in yielding the right of way to others, if you can safely do so.
  • On loop trails, follow the arrows.
  • Do not step onto a boardwalk if someone is already on the boardwalk coming toward you.
  • Treat all with extra courtesy and respect.
  • Leash your dog, use a doggie bag, and take it home with you.
  • Remember to take precautions for ticks.

For extra comfort on the trail, download and print a trail map before you leave home.

Attleboro Land Trust – Coronavirus Contingency Plans

If you were planning to attend or volunteer at one of our events, we understand that your plans might change, based on concerns about the coronavirus. By the same token, we may cancel some of our planned events and activities, out of an abundance of caution, or use various communication tools, rather than face-to-face meetings, to carry out our work. Any cancellations or updates to our scheduled activities will be announced on our website.

Walking the boundaries at the Nickerson Walking Woods Preserve

On Saturday, March 7, 2020, a group of volunteers walked the boundaries of the Nickerson Walking Woods Preserve.  The purpose of the walk was to inspect the condition of the preserve, check for any encroachment of the boundaries, and find existing boundary markers.  From the parking area on Richardson Avenue, we headed for the far corners of the property.

   
A snowfall the previous night had added a sparkle to the landscape.

 

After crossing the power line easement, we found a steel pipe marking the SE corner of Nickerson Walking Woods Preserve.  This point is on the town line between Attleboro and Norton.

 

We placed a witness post near the pipe to make it easier to find next time.

 

The pipe is at the end of this stone wall.

 

We added a sign with our visitor regulations.

 

We walked the entire length of the power line easement from south to north.

 

We put up another regulation sign at the edge of the power line along our northern boundary.

 

Thanks to all who attended the walk!

Boundary Walks on March 14 and 21 are cancelled

A series of boundary walks was planned for the first three Saturdays in March, weather permitting.  The purpose of boundary walks is to maintain signs and markers along the boundaries and to check for encroachment.

The first boundary walk was held at the Nickerson Walking Woods Preserve, 221 Richardson Avenue, on Saturday, March 7.

News About Your Land Trust and More

Click below to read our monthly electronic newsletter, intended for distribution over social media, that includes news of what is happening at our conservation properties, as well as general conservation topics. There are also articles on Attleboro history, with a focus on the Barrows Farm (now the Richardson Preserve) and what seasonal tasks the Barrows family might have been working on as they derived their living from this land 300 years ago. News of the Attleboro Community Garden is also a regular feature.
This publication is being produced by the Education and Outreach Committee of the Attleboro Land Trust, local volunteers, and some of the classes at Attleboro High School.

Newsletters

Contact us if you would like to subscribe to the email version of this newsletter.

Boughs of holly festoon the Richardson Preserve

After 24 hours of rain, sleet, and snow, the Richardson Nature Preserve glistened on the morning of December 18, 2019.  An American holly tree is in the foreground.  The red berries, found only on female trees, provide food for many birds.

Many help launch an invasive plant removal project at Larson Woodland

Invasive species are organisms that are not native to an area, that tend to spread and displace native species, and that have harmful consequences for the environment.  Invasive species include animals, plants, and even fungi.  In the twentieth century, diseases caused by non-native fungi–accidentally introduced in North America–devastated elm and chestnut trees.  Invasive gypsy moths have damaged many other local tree species.

Invasive trees and shrubs are common in our area and threaten to crowd out native plants–wreaking havoc with native ecosystems.  The Attleboro Land Trust has launched an invasive removal project focusing on Larson Woodland.  At four acres, this is one of our smaller nature preserves.  This will serve as a demonstration project, and we hope to apply lessons learned to our other preserves.

A survey of the preserve was conducted by Gary Krofta and Phil Boucher, resulting in a map identifying the invasive species to be targeted and their locations.  Longtime watershed protection advocate Don Doucette has been a key advisor.  The project was kicked off on Saturday, November 23.  Among the volunteers who pitched in was a contingent of Scouts from Attleboro Troop 15.

A good turnout of volunteers helped to remove invasive plant species at Larson Woodland on November 23, 2019.    Image credit: C. Adler

Oriental bittersweet was removed from the banks of the Ten Mile River near the spillway.  The bright red berries (once prized for their decorative value during the winter holidays) were bagged and will be burned to prevent propagation of new plants.

Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) is an invasive vine that originated in China.    Image credit: C. Adler

Some large non-native honeysuckle bushes along Riverbank Road were also removed.

Scouts from Troop 15 removing an invasive honeysuckle bush at Larson Woodland.    Image credit: C. Adler

Project work parties will continue in the spring.  Some of the other species to be targeted are buckthorn, purple loosestrife, and Norway maple.  We welcome more volunteers to help with the work.